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Health & Food

Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Group - Harnessing acoustically driven multiphase fluids

Ultra-high-speed measurements and modeling of acoustically driven micron-sized bubbles and droplets for biomedical and engineering applications.

The research in our group aims at broadening the understanding of various small-scale multiphase fluid phenomena, such as bubble and droplet dynamics and the resulting fast flows, especially when coupled with acoustic waves. We develop experimental techniques to observe and characterise high-speed multiphase fluid phenomena optically and acoustically. Our key research areas lie around the fundamentals of cavitation and the dynamics of bubbles, such as acoustically driven oscillations of encapsulated micro-bubbles, acoustic droplet vaporization, bubble interactions with vessels and soft tissues, and bubble clouds in lithotripsy using shock waves and high-intensity focused ultrasound.
Our laboratory is well equipped for the synthesis and characterization of micrometric bubbles and droplets with a diverse range of surfactants. We explore different compositions to achieve the desired response to acoustic driving. The agents are fabricated via amalgamation, sonication and microfluidics. The facility is equipped with state of the art measurement techniques, such as Ultrahigh speed camera capable of recording up to 10 million fps, optical tweezers for particle manipulation and medical ultrasound research platform with numerous acoustic transducers, to study the fast dynamics of these agents.
Our group also aims at supplementing experimental observations with numerical simulations to model and predict the observed phenomena or to gain further information on the underlying flows. Our numerical methods include an in-house built code for the Boundary Integral Method as well as expertise in COMSOL, OpenFOAM, k-wave (Matlab toolbox) and ECOGEN (compressible hydrodynamics).

Contact

Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Group Gazendra Shakya+41 44 632 65 28gshakya@ethz.chhttps://ifd.ethz.ch/research/group-supponen.html